How to Help Students

Services offered to students through CAPS: Telephone Appointments, Zoom Sessions, Virtual Groups and Wellness Workshops, Individual Appointments, Couples Counseling (both parties need to be currently enrolled as students)

  • Depressed Mood
  • Anxiety
  • Typical ways of coping are no longer helpful
  • Stress Management
  • Abuse of alcohol and/or other drugs
  • Sexuality
  • Personal/Family Relationships
  • Grief and Loss
  • Dealing with trauma and abuse
  • First-generation students

  • Significant change in appearance or behavior
  • Appearing withdrawn
  • Decline in quality of work or class participation/ missed classes or assignments
  • Agitation, non-stop talking, disruptive angry outbursts
  • Expressionless face, appears sad
  • Disheveled appearance
  • Verbal warning signs of suicide, “I can’t go on.” “My family would be better off without me.” “Who cares if I’m not around anyway?” “If ____ happens, I’ll kill myself.”

Mental Health Concern

A non-urgent and non-life-threatening situation in which an individual is experiencing emotional distress or discomfort, yet still able to function and take care of themselves. Examples include situations when someone is:

  • Stressed, anxious, upset, crying, or sad
  • Frustrated or confused about a personal or academic situation
  • Having a friendship or relationship conflict
  • Dealing with grief, loss, sadness, or disappointment
  • Not taking their prescribed psychiatric medication

What to do

Students with a Mental Health Concern can contact Counseling & Psychological Services
8 a.m.- 5 p.m. at 209-667-3381
After-Hours Crisis Line: 209-667-3381 (press 2)

Mental Health Crisis

A non-life-threatening situation in which someone is exhibiting an extremely emotional or behavioral disturbance, considering harm to self or others, disoriented, has a compromised ability to function or is otherwise agitated and unable to be calmed.

Examples include situations when someone is:

  • Talking about suicide or self-harm
  • Talking about threatening or dangerous behavior
  • Recently engaged in self-injurious behavior
  • Currently abusing alcohol or other drugs
  • Behaving erratically or unusually

What to do

Contact Counseling & Psychological Services
8 a.m.- 5 p.m. at 209-667-3381
After-Hours Crisis Line: 209-667-3381 (press 2)

National Suicide Preventions 1 (800)-273-TALK (8255)

Crisis Text Line: Text HOME to 741-741

Mental Health Emergency

A life-threatening situation in which an individual is in imminent danger of harming themselves or others, severely disoriented, out of touch with reality, is unable to function, severely distraught, or out of control.

Examples including situations when someone is:

  • Threatening suicide or acting on a suicide threat
  • Homicidal or threatening harm to others
  • Already injured and needs medical attention
  • Severely impaired by drugs or has overdosed
  • Highly erratic or behaving in a way that suggests an inability to care for oneself

What to do

Call 911

GO TO THE NEAREST EMERGENCY ROOM

Contact Counseling & Psychological Services
8 a.m.- 5 p.m. at 209-667-3381
After-Hours Crisis Line: 209-667-3381 (press 2)

National Suicide Preventions 1 (800)-273-TALK (8255)

Crisis Text Line: Text HOME to 741-741

In Non-Emergency Situations

  • Remain Calm
  • Comment on what you have observed
    • “I’m concerned because you’ve missed several classes and today you seemed distracted. I also noticed that you fell asleep in class the other day. How have you been feeling lately?”
  • Listen carefully to the student without judging
    • Be mindful of how a student’s culture may affect their perspective of CAPS. Ask if they have a support system who they can reach out to for help (elders, family members, etc)
  • Suggest counseling or provide other helpful resources. Students may call CAPS 209-667-3381 to schedule an appointment.

What NOT to do

  • Do NOT agree to be sworn to secrecy. NEVER agree to keep suicidal or violent thoughts in confidence.
  • DO NOT ask students to “pick themselves up by their bootstraps” or ignore the problem. (DO NOT motivate with tough love)
  • DO NOT become frustrated if your suggestions are resisted.
  • DO NOT judge students from your own cultural norms
    • While in some cultures it may be viewed as disrespectful or hostile, lack of eye contact in some cultures communicates respect and loud/expressive language in some cultures may invite passionate and respectful dialogue.

If you are concerned about a colleague:

  • It doesn’t hurt to check in. (I’ve noticed that you’ve mentioned that you’ve felt lonely during our conversations, I just wanted to check in to see if you need any extra support from me?)
  • Trust your gut
  • Offer resources to the Employee Assistance Program or to explore mental health benefits through insurance plan.
  • Recommend utilization of TAO Connect

Updated: March 08, 2022