Hazard Communication (HAZCOM)

Hazard Communication Program

The Hazard Communication Program describes hazardous substances used in each workplace, a system of labeling containers, Safety Data Sheets for each hazardous substance used, and a comprehensive training program for employees who use hazardous materials. 

California’s Right-To-Know Law requires that workers and supervisors be provided ready access to important health and safety information regarding hazardous substances in their work area. A hazardous substance is any material that can potentially harm you. These substances can be solids (asbestos), liquids (sulfuric acid), dusts (metals, lead), cleaning compounds, inks, etc.

The Globally Harmonized System (GHS)

What is the GHS?

The Globally Harmonized System of the Classification and Labeling of Chemicals is a set of guidelines for ensuring the safe production, transport, handling, use and disposal of hazardous materials.

What is a Safety Data Sheet (SDS)?

A Safety Data Sheet or SDS (also referred to as a Material Safety Data Sheet or MSDS) is a document that provides information about the hazards of a chemical or product. They vary in style and content, but all contain certain required sections. State and Federal law requires that all manufacturers and distributors of chemical products provide the end user with a manufacturer specific SDS. 

The goal of the SDS is to provide the user with a summarized, multi-source resource that informs the user of certain basic but necessary pieces of information regarding the substance they are about to use. The SDS informs the user about the material's physical properties and related health effects, personnel protective equipment necessary to protect the user, first aid treatment necessary in the event of an exposure, how to respond to accidents, and the planning that may be necessary in order to safely handle a spill.

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