Mindful Self-Compassion

This resource library, created by our PEER Project student interns, will walk you through Dr. Kristin Neff’s and Dr. Christopher Germer’s Mindful Self-Compassion workbook. Mindful Self-Compassion is a proven way to accept yourself, build inner strength, and thrive. In this resource library, we’ve highlighted key concepts as well as ways in which you can incorporate mindful self-compassion in your life through daily practice.

What is Self-Compassion?

In this section, we introduce the three elements of self-compassion: mindfulness, self-kindness and common humanity; dispel some common misconceptions and highlight the benefits of mindful self-compassion.

flyer, see text for flyer contentSelf-Compassion.pdf

  • Self-compassion is a practice and includes mindfulness, common humanity and self-kindness.
  • Self-compassion involves becoming aware of your emotions, feelings, and patterns while also accepting them.
  • Self-compassion tells us what we are experiencing is okay, as it is a part of humanity to experience the ups and downs; we are not alone in our struggles.
  • Self-compassion emphasizes becoming an ally with yourself instead of an enemy. It allows you to treat yourself the way you would treat someone you care about, or someone who shares with you a challenging time they are going through.
  • This information is adapted from the Mindful Self-Compassion Workbook written by Kristin Neff, PhD and Christopher Germer, PhD. This infographic was created Vanessa Sandoval, MSW Intern for the Health Education & Promotion Office at Stanislaus State.

flyer, see text for flyer contentMindfulness.pdf

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Mindfulness | Practicing Mindfulness - A Student Perspective

  • Mindfulness is an essential component of self-compassion, as it is the first step we need to take in order to be self-compassionate.
  • Mindfulness involves being open to the reality of the present moment by allowing all thoughts, emotions and sensations without resistance to or avoidance.
  • Mindfulness is an essential component of self-compassion because we need to be able to “feel it to heal it.” This means we must acknowledge when we’re suffering and set with our pain long enough to respond with care and kindness.
  • Mindfulness is the first step of self-compassion as we need to be present with our thoughts. This allows us to respond in a way that avoids drowning ourselves in our sorrows and getting away with negative reactions.
  • This information is adapted from the Mindful Self-Compassion Workbook written by Kristin Neff, PhD and Christopher Germer, PhD. This infographic was created Yolanda Verduzco, MSW Intern for the Health Education & Promotion Office at Stanislaus State.

flyer, see text for flyer contentSelf-Kindness.pdf

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  • Self-kindness is one of the three elements of self-compassion
  • Self-kindness is allowing you to comfort yourself, provide yourself with unconditional love and acceptance, and be there for yourself
  • Take a second to notice when you are being self-critical, putting yourself down for any shortcomings or mistakes, and instead say to yourself what you would say to a good friend who was experiencing the same thing.
  • This information is adapted from the Mindful Self-Compassion Workbook written by Kristin Neff, PhD and Christopher Germer, PhD. This infographic was created Vanessa Sandoval, MSW Intern for the Health Education & Promotion Office at Stanislaus State.

flyer, see text for flyer contentCommon Humanity.pdf

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  • Common humanity is one of the three elements of self-compassion.
  • No one is perfect. Suffering is a natural and normal part of the shared human experience. This is a part of our common humanity.
  • All humans have flaws. We all make mistakes and we all encounter difficult feelings. It’s easy to get down on yourself with these feelings arise, but remember, life entails suffering, for everyone, without exception.
  • You are not alone. Negative thoughts and experiences are not a result of something you lack. There is nothing wrong with you, life is just hard sometimes.
  • This information is adapted from the Mindful Self-Compassion Workbook written by Kristin Neff, PhD and Christopher Germer, PhD. This infographic was created Mandy Schloss, MSW Intern for the Health Education & Promotion Office at Stanislaus State.

flyer, see text for flyer contentBenefits of Mindful Self-Compassion.pdf

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  • People who are more self-compassionate experience less depression, anxiety, stress and shame while also experiencing more happiness, life satisfaction, self-confidence and greater physical health.
  • Self-compassion can be learned. You can learn to be more mindful and compassionate toward yourself. It requires practice just like any other skill, but it can radically transform the way you relate to yourself, and by doing so, radically transform your life.
  • This information is adapted from the Mindful Self-Compassion Workbook written by Kristin Neff, PhD and Christopher Germer, PhD. This infographic was created Mandy Schloss, MSW Intern for the Health Education & Promotion Office at Stanislaus State.

flyer, see text for flyer contentMisconceptions of Self-Compassion.pdf

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  • “Self-compassion is a form of self-pity.” This is a misconception. Self-compassionate people accept and understand that life will throw everyone curve balls. While self-pity emphasizes a “poor me” attitude, self-compassionate individuals recognize that things happen to everyone so the least you can do is be kind to yourself while working through obstacles.
  • “Self-compassion means weakness.” This is a misconception. A lot of us feel we have to be strong and not allow our natural human emotions to get the best of us. Self-compassion is actually one of the most powerful and beneficial sources of resilience and coping available to us.
  • “Self-compassion is narcissistic.” This is a misconception. Self-compassion is not the same as self-esteem. Self-esteem is an evaluation of self-worth while self-compassion is having overall acceptance and kindness for yourself.
  • “Self-compassion is selfish.” This is a misconception. The relationship you have with yourself is very important as it will play a role with the relationships you have with others. In order to be able to care for others and demonstrate compassion towards them, it is important to are for yourself and show yourself the same love you give to others. Studies show self-compassionate people are more caring and supportive in their relationships.
  • This information is adapted from the Mindful Self-Compassion Workbook written by Kristin Neff, PhD and Christopher Germer, PhD. This infographic was created Vanessa Sandoval, MSW Intern for the Health Education & Promotion Office at Stanislaus State.