Geography Classes

Geography Classes

Lower Division

GEOG 2010 Introduction to Physical Geography (3 units)
(Formerly Introduction to Natural Environment) Analysis of the distribution and character of major aspects of the natural environment, including weather, climate, landforms, soils, vegetation, and their significance and meaning to humans; humankind€™s impact on and use of these elements. Satisfies G.E. area D2. (Fall, Spring)

GEOG 2020 Introduction to Cultural Geography (3 units)
A broad-based geographical survey of major components of human culture, including forms of livelihood, religion, and language. An introduction to themes in the study of folk culture, popular culture, and settlement patterns. Satisfies G.E. areas D2 and G. (Fall, Spring)

GEOG 2200 Geographer's Toolbox (3 units)
A hands-on introduction to the basic tools, techniques, and methods used by human, environmental, and physical geographers. Satisfies G.E. area E1. (Fall, Spring)

GEOG 2400 World Regional Geography I: Europe and Asia (3 units)
(Formerly World Regional Geography) A regional analysis of Europe and Asia examining the spatial patterns of physical and human phenomena. Includes consideration of physical, cultural, historical, economic, and demographic characteristics. Satisfies G.E. area D2. (Fall, Spring)

GEOG 2410 World Regional Geography II: Africa, Australia, and Latin America (3 units)
A regional analysis of Africa, Australia, and Latin America, examining the spatial patterns of physical and human phenomena. Includes consideration of physical, cultural, historical, economic, and demographic characteristics. Satisfies G.E. area D2.

Upper Division

GEOG 3010 Cultural Geography (3 units)
Study of wide-ranging cultural topics including geopolitics, religion, ethnicity, folk and popular culture, population and migration, agriculture and cities. Examines cultural geographical processes of diffusion, adaptation, representation, and place. Satisfies G.E. areas F3 and G. (Fall, Spring)

GEOG 3020 Human Ecology (3 units)
Study of environmental problems arising from human use of the earth€™s resources. Topics include population dynamics, natural resource management, land use, coastal preservation, energy resources, and humankind€™s relationship to nature. Satisfies G.E. area F3. (Fall, Spring)

GEOG 3100 Climatology (3 units)
The elements and controls of weather and climate; analysis of climatic regions of the world. Prerequisites: GEOG 2010 or consent of instructor. (Fall)

GEOG 3300 Geography of Economic Activities (3 units)
Study of world economic activity from a geographic point of view; systematic analysis of agricultural, mining, and manufacturing patterns in the various regions of the world in relation to their natural and cultural settings. Considers locational determinants of human economic activities. Prerequisites: Junior standing or consent of instructor. (Normally offered alternate years)

GEOG 3330 Ethnic Geography (3 units)
Examines ethnic patterns, processes, identity, and ethnic heritage in North America. Patterns and processes of migration, settlement, and evolving ethnic landscapes in the Central Valley region are emphasized. Satisfies G.E. area G.

GEOG 3340 California Cultures and Environments (3 units)
Examines the natural, economic, political, and cultural processes that shape California€™s diverse physical and human environments. Topics include physiography, climate, hydrogeography, historic and contemporary settlement, and socio-economic issues. Satisfies G.E. area F3. (Fall, Spring)

GEOG 3350 Geography of the Great Central Valley (3 units)
Focuses on the character and complexity of the Great Central Valley by analyzing its physical environment, its people, and their relationship with both the land they occupy and the world beyond. Designed specifically for future teachers. (LIBS Integrative: Social Inquiry) (Spring)

GEOG 3510 Geography of North America (3 units)
Course is a regional and topical analysis of the principal natural and human factors responsible for present patterns of settlement, land use, and cultural systems in the United States and Canada. Topics include physiographic regions, climate, vegetation, migration and settlement, religious and political landscapes, economic patterns and processes, urban processes and cities, U.S./Canada relations. Satisfies G.E. areas F3 and G.

GEOG 3520 Geography of Mexico and Central America (3 units)
Introductory survey course of the human and physical landscapes of Mexico and Central America using interdisciplinary, geospatial approaches to interpret the regions' complexity. Examines biophysical and cultural systems and highlights contemporary environment and development issues. Emphasis on population, migration, cities and urban patterns, natural hazards, tourism, global linkages, sustainability and regional identity. Satisfies G.E. areas F3 and G.

GEOG 3530 Geography of Africa, South of the Sahara (3 units)
Survey of Africa's diverse environments, peoples, and regions using an interdisciplinary approach. Addresses topics related to the biophysical environment, history, culture, demography, and political economy as a basis for understanding contemporary African development issues. Satisfies G.E. areas F3 and G.

GEOG 3550 Geography of Europe (3 units)
Examines the natural, economic, political, and cultural characteristics that shape Europe's physical and human environments. Topics include Europe's natural environments, the past and present-day peopling of Europe, religious and linguistic patterns and processes, economic development, evolving rural and urban areas, and recent political trends. Satisfies G.E. areas F3 and G.

GEOG 3570 Geography of Russia and East Europe (3 units)
A survey of the physical geography, resources, agriculture, industry, people, potential, and problems of Russia and the East European countries. Prerequisites: Junior standing or consent of instructor.

GEOG 3580 Cultural Ecology of Southeast Asian Peoples (4 units)
(Replaces GEOG 3590) Examines the cultures of Southeast Asia and their lifestyles, emphasizing complex interrelations between cultures and their environments. Includes migration and acculturation issues related to Indochinese refugees. Satisfies G.E. area G.

GEOG 3650 Selected Topics in Regional Geography (1-3 units)
Regional emphasis or topic varies each semester. Course may be repeated. Prerequisites: Junior standing or consent of instructor.

GEOG 3700 Cartography and Visualization (3 units)
(Formerly Cartography) Introduction to thematic cartography; fundamentals of cartographic portrayal including map design, compilation, computer drafting, visualization, and reproduction. Designed specifically for future teachers (LIBS Integrative: Social Inquiry). Prerequisites: Three units of geography or consent of instructor. (Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours)

GEOG 3751 Introduction to Computer Applications in Geography (3 units)
Introduces computer systems and programs used in geographic research. Students will utilize systems and programs through the context of a classwide geographic research problem. (Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours)

GEOG 3770 Geographical Methods and Inquiry (3 units)
Integrates geographic ideas and computer technologies such as GPS and GIS through field experience and spatial techniques. It is specifically designed to train K-12 teachers to incorporate geographic context into their classroom. (Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours)

GEOG 3930 Historical Geography of the Central Mother Lode (1 unit)
An individually-paced, two-day field trip which involves following a trip guide to sites in and around the communities of Jamestown, Sonora, Columbia, Angels Camp, Murphys, Jackson, Volcano, Sutter Creek, Amador City, and Fiddletown. At each site, students are directed to play recorded lectures on topics ranging from early gold mines, mining methods, mining towns, local history, geography, and geology. (Fall, Spring)

GEOG 3940 Geography of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (1 unit)
An individually paced, two-day field trip in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Videos and a detailed route notebook will guide students in a study of Delta physical and cultural patterns. (Fall, Spring)

GEOG 3950 Historical Geography of the Northern Mother Lode (1 unit)
An individually paced, two-day field trip which involves following a trip guide to sites in and around the communities of Folsom, Coloma, Grass Valley, Nevada City, and North Bloomfield. At each site, students are directed to play recorded lectures on topics ranging from early gold mines, mining methods, mining towns, local history, geography, and geology. (Fall, Spring)

GEOG 3960 The Yosemite Region (1 unit)
Individually paced field trip of Yosemite National Park and its setting. Topics covered include geology, park history, environmental concerns, and park management. Course involves following an itinerary using a guidebook, maps, and taped discussions which are played in the field at designated locations. Takes two to three days depending on student travel plans. Student arranges own departure/return dates and own transportation. (Fall, Spring)

GEOG 4000 Current Trends in Geography (1-2 units)
A symposium on geography featuring speakers on their special areas of research, including current theories and research approaches in geography. Topics differ each term. May be repeated for no more than 4 units of credit towards the major. Prerequisites: One lower-division geography class or consent of instructor.

GEOG 4050 Restorative Human Ecology (3 units)
A study of current approaches to restore human environmental balance for sustainability and environmental, community, and human health. Includes examination of the ethnoecology of several indigenous cultures. Satisfies G.E. areas F3 and G. One of two paired courses in the G.E. Summit Program (Waking up to Nature: Ethics, Ecology, and Restoration Practices). Prerequisites: Consent of Summit Program Coordinator.

GEOG 4070 Agricultural Geography (4 units)
(Formerly GEOG 3070) Examines a variety of agricultural systems in the world from an agro-ecological approach. The natural resources and cultural factors which interact to shape and change agricultural systems are studied in detail. Prerequisite: One course in physical geography. (Spring)

GEOG 4080 Sustainable Agriculture (3 units)
The study of natural resource sustainability in agriculture integrating theoretical aspects of agricultural sustainability with field-based exercises. (Offered under the subjects of GEOG and AGST) (Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours) (Fall)

GEOG 4090 Geography of Wine (3 units)
Introduction to geographic origins, diffusions, distributions, and patterns of global viticulture. Emphasis on complex relationships existing between environmental variables, such as climate, soils and landforms, and human factors such as cultural practices. Examines characteristics of wine regions and landscapes. (Offered under the subjects GEOG and AGST) (Spring)

GEOG 4120 Geomorphology (3 units)
(Formerly GEOG 3120) Study and interpretation of the Earth€™s natural landforms; their distribution and the processes acting on them; includes consideration of landform evolution under varied climatic regimes. Prerequisites: GEOG 2010 or equivalent course in physical geography or consent of instructor. (Spring)

GEOG 4210 Geographic Problems in the Developing World (3 units)
Analysis of natural and cultural conditions pertinent to development. Consideration of the role of geography in solution of development problems. Prerequisite: An introductory course in geography.

GEOG 4250 The Ethnoecology of Southeast Asia (4 units)
(Same as ANTH 4250) Drawing on case studies from Island and Mainland Southeast Asia (including southern China), this course explores the long history of human-environmental interaction in the region. Examines the causes of stress and instability in that interaction and the attempts to restore viable relationships and systems. Prerequisites: Senior standing or consent of instructor.

GEOG 4301 Permaculture Applications in Diverse Environments (3 units)
(Formerly Geography and Environmental Planning) Examines permaculture approaches in humid tropics/subtropics, arid and semi-arid regions, mountain/cold climates, and urban areas. Prerequisites: Introductory physical geography course or consent of instructor.

GEOG 4350 Urban Geography (4 units)
Study of the spatial aspects of the city. Emphasis on the relationship of cities to each other and to the countryside, as well as on the internal structure and spatial dynamics of urban centers. Special consideration given to problems of the urban environment including urban sprawl, water and recreational needs, and controls of land use. Field trips may be
required. Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor.

GEOG 4610 Historical Geography of the United States (3 units)
A study of the evolution of cultural landscapes in the United States. Emphasis on initial and sequential settlement patterns, routes of diffusion and migration, and use of resources in light of cultural traditions. Comparative analysis of regional differences in material folk culture. Prerequisites: Junior standing or consent of instructor.

GEOG 4650 Seminar in Geography (1-3 units)
Topic or emphasis varies each semester; course may be repeated. Prerequisites: Six units of geography or consent of instructor.

GEOG 4700 Geographical Processes in Arid Landscapes: Death Valley (4 units)
Using field techniques in geography, the course analyzes geomorphic processes, climate characteristics, vegetation patterns and adaptations, and human impacts in an arid environment. Course is taught in Death Valley and is offered only winter term. Prerequisites: A course in physical geography and consent of instructor. (Lecture, 1 hour; activity, 6 hours)

GEOG 4710 Field Methods (WP) (3 units)
Methods of field observation; techniques of data collection and analysis; fieldwork, report writing, and presentation required. Satisfies upper division writing proficiency requirement. Prerequisites: Completion of the Writing Proficiency Screening Test with a passing score. (Lecture, 3 hours; activity, 2 hours)

GEOG 4720 Local Field Excursions (1 unit)
Provides students with directed field experiences, involving travel to and study of areas of special geographic significance such as Yosemite, Point Reyes, Mono Lake, and others. May be repeated to various destinations. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

GEOG 4730 Computer Applications in Geography (1-3 units)
A tutorial course for self-motivated students familiar with computer programs. Students will learn mapping techniques and geographic information systems from available software. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and knowledge of cartography.

GEOG 4750 Geographic Information Systems (3 units)
The use of computers for input, storage, representation, analysis, and retrieval of spatial data for cartographic purposes; GIS as a tool in information management and decision-making. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and computer experience. (Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours)

GEOG 4760 Environmental History of the Central Valley and Its Wetlands (3 units)
The historical transformation of the environment of the Central Valley; the ecological effects of the Valley's massive water projects; the importance of Central Valley wetlands to the migratory waterfowl of the Pacific Flyway. Approximately 50% classroom; 50% field trip. (Course offered under the subjects GEOG and HIST.) Prerequisites: One year of college-level history or consent of instructor.

GEOG 4770 Remote Sensing of the Environment (3 units)
Theories and techniques of remote sensing. Methods of image acquisition, correction, enhancement, classification, and analysis will be examined. Examples from geography, planning, hazards, agriculture, biology, soil science, hydrology, and atmospheric science. (Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours)

GEOG 4800 Survey of Geographic Thought and Literature(3 units)
Survey of the history and philosophy of geography, its place among the sciences and social sciences, and the major contributors to the development of modern scientific geography. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

GEOG 4900 Directed Field Research (1-5 units)
Field research conducted in any subdiscipline of geography under the direction of a specific faculty member. May be repeated for a total of 6 units. Prerequisites: Junior standing and consent of instructor.

GEOG 4910 Cooperative Education (2-4 units)
Provides an opportunity to acquire relevant, practical experience in supervised paid employment within the discipline. Students serve in private or public sector positions under the supervision of the employer and Department Co-op Coordinator. May be repeated for a total of 6 units. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and consent of departmental coordinator. (Fall, Spring).

GEOG 4930 Planning Issues (1-2 units)
On an individual basis, students will attend a selection of urban and/or county planning meetings during one term and develop reports related to issues discussed. Must provide own transportation. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

GEOG 4940 Internship in Geography (1-6 units)
Designed for students who are serving as interns in public or private agencies. Students serve internship as arranged between the agency and the department. Prerequisites: Nine upper-division units in geography and consent of instructor.

GEOG 4950 Selected Topics in Geography (1-5 units)
(Topics to be specified in Class Schedule) Topics vary each term, thus different topics may be taken for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

GEOG 4980 Individual Study (1-4 units)
For students capable of independent work and in need of advanced and specialized study. May be repeated for a total of 6 units. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

GEOG 4990 Senior Thesis (3 units)
Senior thesis (a research topic to be agreed upon by the student and major professor). Geographic research and writing incorporating primary sources of data and geographic methods. Prerequisites: Senior standing, advanced course work in geography, and consent of instructor.