Student Awards

Award-Winning Student Papers at the Annual Phi Alpha Theta History Honor Society Conference for Northern California

First, second, and third-place prizes are awarded for both the graduate and undergraduate student divisions. CSU Stanislaus students, in competition with all the major colleges and universities in northern California, have maintained an outstanding record of prize-winning papers. These are listed below, beginning with the most recent awards.

  • Brandon Guzman, “Cattle and Power: The Origin of California’s Cattle Industry and the Political Power It Came with in the Nineteenth Century,” Third-place prize, Graduate division, 2014.
     
  • Alexandra K. Vicknair, “Mindsets, Motivations, Mickey Mouse and the Mountains: The Political and Social Factors Involved in the Mineral King Controversy, 1965–1978,” Second-place prize, Graduate division, 2013.
     
  • Samantha M. Williams, “’Establishing a Permanent Peace:’ Extinction, Expansion, and the Contradictions of Indian Reform in 1860s America,” Third-place prize, Graduate Division, 2013.
     
  • Marisa Hultgren, “Before the War was Cold: A Case Study of Soviet Infiltration of the OSS,” Second-place prize, Undergraduate division, 2013.
     
  • Andrew C. Gittings, “The Parasitic Free Market: The Rise and Fall of Drawbridge,” Third-place prize, Undergraduate division, 2013.
     
  • Samantha Williams, “Race, Politics, and Military Filibusters: Southern Attempts at Expansion in Antebellum America,” First-place prize, Graduate Division, 2012.
     
  • Joel Virgen, “Responsibility and Identity: Vaclav Havel and Totalitarian Morality,” Third-place prize, Graduate Division, 2012.
     
  • Isaac Farhadian, “Galileo’s Copernicanism: An Examination of the Evolution of Galileo’s Personal Copernican Thought from 1610 to 1615,” Second-place prize, Graduate Division, 2011.
     
  • Jeremy Cornish, “Detroit Calling: The Question of 1970s U.K. Punk as a Revivalist Movement,” Third-place prize, Graduate Division, 2011.
     
  • Hans Hauselmann, “Queering the Family: Expanding the Definition of Families in the United States,” Second-place prize, Graduate division, 2009.
     
  • Tori Gottlieb, “Society Reflected: Women, Abortion, and Roe v. Wade,” Third-place prize, Graduate division, 2009.
     
  • Jeremy Cornish, “Industry and Poverty: The Recipe for Heavy Metal,” Third-place prize, Undergraduate division, 2009.
     
  • Aerynn Dighton, “Portraiture as Propaganda: Color and Elizabethan Iconography,” First-place prize, Graduate division, 2008.
     
  • Grant Ashley, “Charley Bates: One of Stockton, California’s Slaves,” Second-place prize, Graduate division, 2008.
     
  • Teri Lunt, “International Collusion: The Creation of Stateless People in the Japanese Internment Camps” Third-place prize, Graduate division, 2008.